Does Fat Make You Fat?

Does Fat Make You Fat?

We tend to demonize fat in the diet because it is often associated with weight gain, cholesterol and the emergence of cardiovascular disease.

Lipids are essential for the proper functioning of the organism, but with modern food there is a tendency to imbalance the balance of fatty acids, due to too much of poor quality fat.

1) Fatty acids: focus on a large family

There are different categories of fatty acids, which will play a more or less beneficial role on the body:

  • saturated fatty acids (butter, dairy products, cheese, cold cuts, red meat, palm oil, etc.).
  • monounsaturated fatty acids (olive oil, rapeseed oil, hazelnut oil, avocado, almond, pecan, hazelnut, cashew, pistachio, etc.).
  • Omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (sunflower oil, grape seed oil, corn oil, animal products from factory farming, etc.).
  • Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (rapeseed oil, walnut oil, camelina oil, linseed oil, hemp oil, walnuts, ground flax seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds, sardines, mackerel, salmon, purslane, spinach, lamb's lettuce, lentils, split peas, dried beans, animal products from organic farming fed in a natural way ...).

A separate category:

  • Industrial trans fatty acids

They result from a process of hydrogenation of vegetable oils to make food more stable and less conducive to rancidity.

They are present in processed products (margarines, ready meals, industrial pizzas, crisps, cakes, cookies, pastries, pastries, spreads, etc.).

2) The imbalance of the fatty acid balance

It is the quantity and quality in the choice of consumption of lipid intake that will be decisive for the health of the body.

In reality, there are no good or bad fatty acids, all have their uses that will have to be integrated into an overall food balance.

The context of modern food:

  • Excess intake of saturated fatty acids (butter, dairy, cheese, cold meats, red meat, palm oil, etc.) and industrial trans fatty acids (margarines, prepared meals, industrial pizzas, crisps, cakes, cookies, pastries, pastries , spreads…).
  • High consumption of Omega 6 fatty acids (sunflower oil, grapeseed oil, corn oil, animal products from industrial farming, etc.).

It is this context which leads to an imbalance in the balance of fatty acids, to create in the long term risks of health problems and various pathologies, by promoting inflammation, increased cholesterol, the emergence of cardio diseases. vascular, weight gain and obesity ...

The solutions :

  • Avoid industrial trans fatty acids.
  • Limit the consumption of saturated fat.
  • Reduce the amount of Omega 6.
  • Increase the proportion of Omega 3.

3) Focus on Omega 3

Omega 3 are the so-called "good fats", it is the increase in their consumption that will restore the balance of the fatty acid balance.

DISCOVER OUR CURES COLLECTION

88423279_133954371262889_5883942815691440128_n (1)

The benefits of Omega 3:

  • Improved functioning of the heart, vision and memory.
  • Fight against cholesterol and high blood pressure.
  • Satiety and weight regulation.
  • Improved muscle function.
  • Natural anti-inflammatory to prevent the appearance of tendonitis, arthritis, chronic inflammation.
  • Improving mental health and preventing depression.

The main sources of Omega 3:

  • Vegetable oils such as Rapeseed, Walnuts, Camelina, Linen, Hemp… from a 1st raw cold pressing.
  • Nut and almond type oilseeds.
  • Ground flax seeds, hemp, chia ...
  • Oily fish such as sardines, mackerel, anchovies, salmon, tuna ...
  • Legumes and pulses (spinach, lamb's lettuce, lentils, split peas, dried beans, etc.).
  • Animal products (meat and eggs) from organic farming fed in a natural way.

4) Optimize fat intake

On a daily basis, for a balanced fatty acid balance:

  • 50% monounsaturated fatty acids (olive oil, rapeseed oil, hazelnut oil, avocado, almond, pecan, hazelnut, cashew, pistachio…).
  • 20 to 25% saturated fatty acids (butter, dairy, cheese, cold meats, red meat, palm oil…).
  • 20 to 25% polyunsaturated fatty acids Omega 6 (sunflower oil, grape seed oil, corn oil, animal products from industrial farming ...) + Omega 3 (rapeseed oil, walnut oil, camelina oil, oil flaxseed, hemp oil, nuts, ground flax seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds, sardines, mackerel, anchovies, salmon, tuna, purslane, spinach, lamb's lettuce, lentils, split peas, dry beans, animal products from organic farming fed naturally ...) with a ratio of 3 Omega 6 to 1 Omega 3.

Daily lipid requirements:

From 1,2 to 1,5 g per kg of body weight per day with an amount of about 3 g of omega 3.

Example:

For a person weighing 70 kg = 84 g to 105 g of lipids per day.

Examples of lipid intake:

  • 100g of sardines about 10g of lipids.
  • 100g of minced steak about 15g of fat.
  • 100g of chicken fillet about 1g of fat.
  • 100g of tofu about 8g of lipids.
  • 30g of dry sausage about 10g of lipids.
  • 1 egg about 6g of lipids.
  • 10g of butter about 8g of lipids.
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil about 15g of lipids.
  • 30g of nuts about 20g of lipids.
  • 30g of feta about 6g of lipids.

In practice :

Have a sufficient quantitative ration of lipids on a daily basis, by increasing the proportion of Omega 3 quality fats.

Every day :

  • Minimum 1 to 2 tablespoons of extra virgin omega 3 oil (rapeseed, flax, walnuts, camelina…) from a first raw cold pressing, seasoning on food.
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons of seeds (ground flax, hemp, chia, etc.) per meal.
  • At least 30 to 60g of a mixture of nuts and almonds.
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables to fill up on antioxidants and protect good fatty acids.
  • Cooking with gentle steam to avoid the destruction of Omega 3.

2 to 3 times a week:

Oily, fresh or canned fish preferably in glass jars, favoring sardines, mackerel, anchovies containing less heavy metals than salmon or tuna.

To limit:

  • Fatty meats (cold meats, fatty beef, pork, mutton, lamb…).
  • Dairy and industrial fats (butter, margarine, fatty cheese, cream, etc.).
  • Processed products (ready meals, industrial pizzas, crisps, cakes, cookies, pastries, pastries, spreads, etc.).

DISCOVER OUR CURES COLLECTION

CONCLUSION

Fat intake is essential for the proper functioning of the body, and must be integrated into an overall food balance.

It is necessary to adapt its consumption at the quantitative level according to its own needs, while privileging quality fatty acids, in synergy with the presence of other macronutrients (proteins and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, trace elements), in order to benefit beneficial effects on health, weight regulation, and sports performance.

KLEIN Guillaume DIET NUTRI ENERGY

This article is written by our Ambassador Guillaume Klein (Personal Coach Expert in sports nutrition and health / Ultra endurance specialist)

If you would like more information or advice, do not hesitate to contact guillaume via his site

DISCOVER OUR CURES COLLECTION

Nutri-Bay.com uses cookies to provide the best user experience. Please accept cookies to continue exploring our site
Thank you, it's saved!